East Meets West

East-West

Errant scholars claim Marco Polo introduced noodles to Italy after a long sojourn in China. This is probably more myth than reality, but, in antiquity two geographically disparate lands were known to produce noodle dishes: Italy and China.

Today, noodle dishes are a worldwide affair, though they are typically categorized as either vaguely European or Asian in flavor. Hawaii has long been a melting pot of cultures, and Waikiki dining takes that to a new level. Restaurants here have all styles of noodles, from classically styled Italian cuisine and traditional Chinese dishes to Pacific Rim fusion.

Try some of these Island-inspired takes on one of the most popular forms of food in the world. Pro tip: Grab an entrée with fresh fish or other ocean dwellers for a noodle experience you could only find in Waikiki.

Linguine-all-aragosta-e-granchio
Linguine all’aragosta e granchio

Fresco Italian Restaurant
Linguine all’aragosta e granchio: The editor and photographer for this magazine are often invited to try dishes during photo shoots. Generally, they only take a slight sampling. This pasta they not only devoured, they fought for the last bite. The Maine lobster is perfectly done and the tomato cream
sauce may actually be divine. A soy tobiko garnish is an inspired Asian twist to this Italian linguine.

Lo mein and Singapore street noodles

P.F. Chang’s
Lo mein and Singapore street noodles: P.F. Chang’s is one of America’s favorite Chinese-inspired restaurants for a reason. The food is consistently tasty and the Waikiki location offers some local flair only found here. The lo mein is a tried and tested favorite. These slightly thicker noodles are tossed with soy sauce, egg, fresh veggies and your choice of beef, pork, chicken or shrimp. Singapore street noodles are a thinner rice noodle with curry sauce, chicken, shrimp and vegetables. Either dish will keep a noodle lover happy. Try one or order both to share family-style around the table.

Spaghetti and meatballs

Il Lupino
Spaghetti and meatballs: Nothing says Italian more than spaghetti and meatballs. While not a traditional menu item, Il Lupino will add its veal, pork and beef meatballs to any pasta. These massive meatballs are in no danger of rolling away from a casual sneeze, though they are all covered in cheese. Delicious parmesan to be exact. Il Lupino’s spaghetti with meatballs leaves nothing to be desired, except perhaps a longing for a larger  stomach.

Hot udon with shrimp tempura

Miyako
Hot udon with shrimp tempura:  tunning ocean views and a romantic air aren’t the only things Miyako has to offer. The traditional Japanese cuisine will make even sushi-shy individuals into sashimi (raw fish) fiends. Hot udon soup comes with thick noodles in a savory broth. It’s paired with deepfried shrimp tempura and dipping sauce. Scrumptious and satisfying, this soup-and-shrimp combo is a fully cooked option if raw fish isn’t for you.

Spaghetti alla pescatora

Arancino
Spaghetti alla checca: Sometimes, a simple spaghetti dish is all you need. Arancino’s Spaghetti alla checca is just that. Spaghetti noodles, fresh mozzarella, basil and a classic tomato sauce come together in this elegant and thoroughly delicious pasta. Spaghetti alla pescatora: Seafood lovers will rejoice in this spaghetti dish that features  shrimp, calamari, live clams, mussels and a garlicky white wine sauce. It’s clear why this pasta is consistently a guest favorite. Be sure to bring a camera, this dish is a feast for the eyes as well.