Category Archives: Articles

Cooking with Aloha. An Interview with Ed Kenney

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ED KENNEY IS A BUSY MAN. The successful restaurateur owns four popular restaurants, sits on several community boards and is to host the PBS culinary travel show, “Family Ingredients.” The chef has had many accolades, including being named as a finalist several times for Best Chef: West by the James Beard Foundation. Kenney’s first three restaurants, Town, Kaimuki Superette and Mud Hen Water, are all within a few blocks of each other in this vibrant community Kaimuki, and are known for fresh farm-to-table ingredients and traditional Hawaiian flavors. In April of 2016, Kenney made the leap to Waikiki when he opened Mahina & Sun’s in the Surfjack hotel. All of these restaurants go by Kenney’s mantra, “Local first, organic whenever possible, with aloha always.”

 

What caused you to make the leap to Waikiki from your base of restaurants in Kaimuki?

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When doing some research for the Surfjack’s restaurant concept, the original owners found the style and taste of cuisine they were looking for when they dined at Town. Our Kaimuki restaurants’ ongoing mission to create community gathering places that reconnect people to the food they eat and those they eat with was aligned with their vision. Spending a lot of time in Waikiki during my childhood, it brought back a sense of nostalgia when we were asked to partner with the Surfjack. My parents were performers at the Hilton Hawaiian Village and Halekulani back before the properties became sprawling resorts, so I spent a lot of time in town watching them perform. With Mahina & Sun’s concept, we’re treating both visitors and locals to an authentic taste of Hawaii with what is offered on the seasonal menu.

 

What sets Mahina & Sun’s apart from your other restaurants?

Mahina & Sun’s menu has been created from the same set of values as my other restaurants, utilizing local, organic produce and sustainable seafood. We wanted to turn the restaurant into a community gathering place in Waikiki, where visitors and locals feel comfortable and “come as you are” for spontaneous cocktails, a special occasion or even just a great cup of coffee.

The theme of our menu is elevated home-cooking with an emphasis on sustainable seafood. The dishes are new and stylish, like the Surfjack, but are influenced from childhood upbringings – growing up on Oahu and my mom’s cooking – from the Portuguese Bean Soup to the spicy ahipalaha (tuna) found in the Mahina’s Bowl, most of these recipes were from my childhood.

 

You’re known for partnering with Hawaii farms like MA‘O Organic
Farm to showcase local ingredients. Tell me a little about why that
is so important to you individually and to the dishes you serve.

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Most restaurants are proud to note locally sourced products on a menu, but, for me, it’s more important to have the physical relationships with the farms and farmers. The farmers we collaborate with, like MA‘O, are now ohana. By purchasing and consuming locally sourced product, we are committed to our community, to our farmers and to our aina. In sourcing and eating local, we look at how we are able to give back to the planet that ultimately provides us with the food we eat.

 

You’ve been able to cook for former First Lady Michelle Obama.
What was that experience like?

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It was an honor! And, actually, it was one of my dreams to cook for her. When she planted a garden at the White House, she sent a message about nutrition and connecting oneself to the land. We both have strong beliefs regarding food education and policy. Mrs. Obama visited us at MA‘O and we provided her with a firsthand look of the farm of which we source most of our ingredients. MA‘O not only gives back to the community, but also educates our state’s youth by providing them with an opportunity to attend college while learning about the land. The Obamas also dined with us at Mahina & Sun’s over the 2016 holiday upon the former President’s approval to expand Papahanaumokuakea, making it the largest protected place in the world. This impacts the fishing industry and forces us to help protect our supply of sustainable seafood. We’re very grateful to have had them experience our menu offerings.

 

Many of the people who read Waikiki Menus come from out of town. Do you have any recommendations on bringing Island inspired flavors into dishes back home?

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On the menu, guests will not only be able to eat local products but most important, get to try indigenous plates based from Hawaiian canoe crops such as paiai (undiluted taro) and ulu (breadfruit). Most of our menu items are listed as their traditional Hawaiian names, such as akule (big eye scad), hee (octopus) and au ku (swordfish). These offerings are not normally found in Waikiki’s popular restaurants nor are they listed in Hawaiian. It may be some vacationer’s first experience hearing the Hawaiian name as well as tasting the Hawaiian dish!

Hot for Summer

hot-for-summer

I was very nearly an Independence Baby, set to make my debut on the Fourth of July. My patriotic parents were proud. Instead I came a few days early, on Canada Day of all days. Still, the summer sun runs in my veins and all year I yearn for backyard barbeques and that special night punctuated by bursts of fireworks in the sky. Luckily for me, now I live in Hawaii, where summer never quite leaves, and there are weekly fireworks in Waikiki.

Summer in Hawaii is a beautiful time of year for everyone, when the plumeria bloom and the beach beckons. While you enjoy your stay in our beautiful Islands, take some time to explore the special meals Waikiki chefs have to offer.

 

cinnamons-

Ripe fruit is a hallmark of good summer food, from strawberries to watermelon, and beyond. Here in Waikiki’s perennial summer, papaya is always abundant and makes the perfect side, or it can be cut lengthwise to make a boat that other tasty edibles can be piled onto. Cinnamon’s at the ‘Ilikai does just that. The chef there uses half of a papaya and stuffs it with savory curry chicken. It’s all on a bed of fresh tossed greens and served with toasted Portuguese sweet bread.

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Cinnamon’s is open for three meals a day, and it’s famous for fluffy pancakes in exotic flavors like guava chiffon. Breakfast is served all day, but lunch and dinner entr´ees are only available during specified hours. Your best bet is to come later in the day to try all of the tastes Cinnamon’s has to offer.

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fresco-

Fresco Italian Restaurant at the Hilton Hawaiian Village brings Old World flavors to the Pacific with a Hawaiian twist. Where else would a menu have bruschetta and poke on the appetizer menu? One of the restaurant’s best appetizer concoctions is a definite blend of Island and Italian flavors with the gamberri pancetta. Picture this: jumbo shrimp wrapped in bacon and pan-fried, accompanied by smoked cheddar cheese and slaw, all doused in aged balsamic. While most appetizers are meant to be shared around the table, in the interest of preserving friendships, it might be best for all diners to get their own.

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Seasonal specials are great any time of year, using what’s freshly available to complement the climate. Hatsuhana, located in the Rainbow Bazaar at the Hilton Hawaiian Village, has one of the best summer lunch specials around. The special brings together a simple side salad, a bowl of ramen soup and premium- grade sashimi on rice. It’s a little bit of everything you could want from a Japanese restaurant in paradise.

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Hatsuhana isn’t just a lunch spot. It serves food all day long. Try a traditional Japanese breakfast, or come back for dinner and feast on sushi and tempura.

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rtp

When I was a kid, summer always seemed to be the time of year when pizza was abundant. There were birthday parties and swim socials that all catered extra-large pizza pies that my peers and I ate before they were sufficiently cool. I couldn’t get enough.

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Thankfully, Round Table Pizza has always been a steady favorite with perfectly chewy crust, flavorful sauce and premium toppings. Round out the meal with a healthy salad and tasty garlic parmesan twists. If one of the specialty pizzas isn’t exactly your fancy, choose from a variety of sauces and toppings for your own unique pie. Those staying in Waikiki can also enjoy free delivery.

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rumfire-

RumFire at the Sheraton Waikiki is a hotspot year-round. It’s known for nightly live music followed by a DJ and dancing right by the famous swells of Waikiki beach. Visitors less inclined to nightlife can spend a relaxing afternoon there on the lanai with a spiked tea. But for something that truly screams of summer, try its modern take on a campfire classic with the “s’mores” coconut macaroon.

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The s’mores start off with a grahamcracker crumble with in erspersed flakes of coconut. That’s topped with a rich, bittersweet chocolate and finished with a lacquered marshmallow. It’s hard to improve on a summer favorite that is loved in part for its sheer simplicity, but the s’mores coconut macaroon is certainly better than any dessert I ever made at a campfire.

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Summer salads are a must when the day’s heat rises and only a cool meal will do. In Hawaii, the best salads also come with some kind of fish, preferably poke, the Hawaiian cubed raw fish. P.F. Chang’s fresh Hawaiian ahi poke salad is everything you could ask for in a summer salad. It uses fresh ahi tuna diced and spread over organic field greens, cabbage slaw, radish kaiware sprouts and green onions. The whole thing is drizzled with signature poke sauce and wonton strips, then dressed with sesame vinaigrette. For other great summer meals, try the Waikiki roll or shaka roll sushi.

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wok-kiki-

Nothing is as hot as the fiery spices that accompany some of the Chinese fare at Wok-kiki. For those who prefer mild food, don’t worry, the restaurant has plenty of that, too. In fact, as a Chinese buffet just steps from the Hilton Hawaiian Village, Wok-kiki has a wide array of choices.

wok-kiki-hot-for-summer

Open for all meals, Wok-kiki starts the day with an American-style breakfast with bacon and eggs among other favorites. At lunch, it starts the switch to Chinese cuisine with roast pork, kung pao chicken, char siu and more. Dinner diners are treated to seafood such as mussels and salt and pepper shrimp. All meals come with a drink, and there’s a full bar with alcoholic beverages for purchase.

Beyond Out West. Hawaiian Cowboys Ranching in Paradise

paniolo

by Julie Yaste

Driving through Gunstock Ranch on Oahu’s North Shore requires four-wheel drive and steady hand.  It’s clear that traversing the hilly terrain is actually easier on horseback, something the ranch is known for, than in modern car.

As we drive through the ranch, owner Greg Smith stops the pickup, slowly backs up a short slope and peers across me into the brush. He’s looking straight at a massive cow with long horns. A look of mild disconcertion crosses his face.

“This cow had a little calf with her the other day,” he says. “Now I don’t see it.”

The ranch has around 130 cows, and Smith knows every one of them. I can tell that, after he drops me off at my car, he’ll probably come back to investigate, or at least keep an eye out for the calf over the coming days.

Smith is a fourth-generation rancher, born in Kailua, on Oahu’s windward side. His late father, Max Smith, was a veterinarian in Arizona who saw a job opening in Hawaii and thought it might be fun to move to the Islands for a year. Instead, he stayed for the rest of his life, eventually becoming the Hawaii state veterinarian for 30 years. He opened Gunstock Ranch in 1973, and it’s been family run ever since.

Max Smith left a line of Western ranchers on the Mainland, but he joined an island chain with a rich history of ranching that largely predates that of the Wild West.

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Cows and horses graze in designated pastures throughout the ranch.

It started in 1793, when Capt. George Vancouver gifted King Kamehameha the Great with a few cattle on the Island of Hawaii, or the Big Island, as it’s known locally. At that point, Hawaii had no large land mammals. The following year, Vancouver returned with more cattle, enough to grow a herd.

Kamehameha the Great made killing these cows kapu, or forbidden, and the herd prospered, but at a price. They soon became a nuisance and, in 1830, Kamehameha III lifted the kapu, allowing people to hunt the cattle.

Within a few years, Kamehameha III sent a group of high chiefs to California to hire vaqueros, or Mexican horse and cattle handlers. These vaqueros helped teach people on Hawaii Island how to break horses and herd cattle.

Soon a Hawaiian breed of cowboys emerged: the paniolo.

It’s unclear exactly where the name paniolo came from, but most attribute it to a corruption or mistranslation of the word Española. Some argue that it comes from Hawaiian words meaning, “sit up straight,” (noho I pololei) for the way cowboys sit upright while riding. Either way, a quick survey of rodeos in the Islands shows that, whatever the origin, paniolo pride is strong in Hawaii.

Max Smith fit in with that tradition after his arrival on Oahu. He may have started as a cowboy, but, in 1999, he was inducted into the Paniolo Hall of Fame.

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Visitors enjoy a guided trail ride through the property; little girl makes new friends in the petting zoo; spectacular view from one of the vantages seen on most trail rides; friendly goat waits for treats at the petting zoo; female steer watches over several young calves; couple takes a ride through the ranch.

Today, Greg Smith, Max’s son, runs the ranch. Although Greg was born and raised in Hawaii, and comes from a long line of ranchers, he is somewhat reluctant to say too much about paniolo culture.

“There’s a lot more rich tradition on the Big Island,” Greg says.

That’s true. Most of the great paniolo ranches today are on the Big Island. That is where cattle were first introduced to Hawaii and it has the most acreage for ranch-land. Many restaurants around Waikiki that offer Hawaii-grown beef have selections from Hawaii Island.

But there are still some ranches on Oahu, aside from Gunstock Ranch, that herd cattle and offer tours, such as the famous Kualoa Ranch (not pictured), where multiple movies and TV shows have been filmed over the years.

Gunstock Ranch is smaller than Kualoa, both in size and operation. It’s a leased property and the land it sits on was once part of the massive infrastructure of sugar plantations that stretched across Hawaii. When sugar started to decline, it opened up tracts of land around the Islands for other things, such as ranching, though that pursuit has its drawbacks in paradise.

“Ranching is hard, because there’s not a lot of money in it,” says Greg. In fact, Greg works a regular 40-hour-a-week job at Fish and Wildlife on top of running Gunstock Ranch.

The low profit margin for ranching on Oahu is largely due to the staggering value of property. It’s hard to make money with any agricultural venture in the state, even though Hawaii’s climate and rich soil are known to produce quality fruits and vegetables, such as the famous Hawaiian pineapple or Kona coffee.

One of the things Gunstock Ranch does to turn a profit, and for the sheer pleasure of it, is offer horseback riding. The rides at Gunstock are unique on Oahu, because the typical tour group is small, with only about 12 people. There are also specialty rides, such as a guided picnic ride, after which the group can relax at the top of a cliff and enjoy both a stunning view and a good meal.

The ranch itself owns about 50 horses in addition to its 130 cattle. The ranch also boards about 50 horses, so that locals without the land or means to keep horses at home can still have their own equine friends.

Greg is glad to provide this and other services to Oahu. “That’s kind of how we feel we help preserve the paniolo lifestyle,” he says, “by letting people own horses.”

Colors of Paradise

BLUE HAWAII

Combine rum, blue Curacao, pineapple juice, cream of coconut, and crushed ice in a blend.  Puree on high speed until smooth.  Pour into a chilled glass.

Garnish with a slice of pineapple and a maraschino cherry.


MAI TAI

Combine orange juice, pineapple juice, light rum, Triple Sec and lime in a glass and stir or shake.  Top with dark rum.

Garnish with a slice of pineapple and a maraschino cherry.


PINA COLADA

Combine rum, coconut milk, pineapple juice and ice in a blender. Puree on high speed until smooth and serve in a tiki glass.

Garnish with a slice of pineapple.


MOJITO

Muddle lime juice, sugar and mint leaves in a glass. Add white rum and fill the remaining space with ice and soda water. Stir or shake before serving.

Garnish with mint.


BANANA DAIQUIRI

Combine half a frozen banana, light rum, coconut milk, lime juice and crushed ice in a blender. Puree on high speed until smooth. Pour into a chilled highball glass.

Garnish with a maraschino cherry.

Hawaii’s Best Beef

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NOTHING BEATS HAWAII’S LOCALLY GROWN BEEF

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Burgers are an American favorite for good reason. Nothing can compare to quality ground beef grilled to perfection and served up on a bun. Bill’s does one better with a patty made from Big Island grass fed beef. Grass fed beef tends to taste slightly different from traditional mass-produced corn-fed beef, because the cattle are allowed to roam, developing muscles and feeding in pastures. The result in this burger is an almost buttery flavor, deliciously paired with pickled chillies, rocket and herb mayo, and crispy French fries.


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The truth is in the name at Heavenly in the Shoreline Hotel. The eatery specializes in locally sourced, healthy options for breakfast, lunch and dinner. One of the dinner favorites is the Big Island Kulana Ranch rib eye steak. It is served steaming on a skillet with grilled vegetables. If that’s not enough, it’s served with Naked Cow truffle sauce to make an already mouth-watering meal positively tantalizing. Try it with a signature cocktail from the bar
for a well-rounded meal.


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Azure is one of Waikiki’s premierefine dining locations, with Chef Shaymus Alwin, who last year was invited to cook at the prestigious James Beard House. It’s no surprise that the restaurant takes steak seriously. Its Hawaii rancher’s rib eye steak is a prime cut of local beef, cooked to the diner’s preference (although a nice rare is always delightful), then served on a bed of creamed kale and Hamakua mushrooms, with creamy Yukon potatoes. The steak is topped with crispy shallots and a divine red wine sauce. Be sure to wear loose clothing, because you’ll want to eat every morsel.

PRESERVING AGRICULTURE IN HAWAII

Article by Julie Yaste

agriculture

The Hawaii Agriculture Research Center is working to keep agriculture alive in the Islands

For centuries, Hawaiians were self-sufficient, able to live off the bounty of the ocean and the fertile land, harvesting the plants and livestock they had brought with them across the Pacific, such as taro and chickens. When Captain James Cook first landed on Hawaii in 1778, he found a place rich in culture and not lacking in natural resources.

But with the introduction of Western culture, Hawaii started to change. Soon Kamehameha the Great united the Islands into a single kingdom, and then began trading with colonial powers.

Within 100 years of Cook’s landing, Hawaii’s landscape and culture had changed dramatically. Foreign investors planted large sugar plantations across the Islands to take advantage of the tropical climate, and immigrants from around the world were employed to work the land.

The different sugar plantations were always searching for the best strain of sugar to grow and harvest. So they came together in 1895 to fund a research center to find the best varietals for Hawaii.

Sugar production declined over the past 50 years, and, in 2016, the last sugar plantation closed on Maui. But the research center that the industry initially funded has morphed into the Hawaii Agricultural Research Center (HARC), located in Kunia and Maunawili on Oahu. The now nonprofit organization works to research agricultural techniques to promote viable farming in modern Hawaii.

Left: A cacao plant growing in Maunawili. Right: Ripe coffee ready for picking at the Maunawili farm.
Left: A cacao plant growing in Maunawili. Right: Ripe coffee ready for picking at the Maunawili farm.

 

“As the plantations closed, they asked, what could they do to replace it,” says Tyler Jones, Maunawili station manager. “While sugar declined, that opened up space to work on other crops.”

The question of what to do in post-plantation agriculture is at the heart of HARC’s research. Along with a small staff, Jones works on developing new agricultural techniques that will benefit local farmers in the wake of Hawaii’s plantation past.

One of the projects Jones and HARC has focused on is finding ways to commercially grow and cultivate koa wood. Koa, meaning “warrior,” is a strong native hardwood in Hawaii. It’s incredibly valuable as a building material for canoes and furniture, but it’s also the traditional material to make ukulele and has been adopted to make guitars and other instruments.

It’s illegal in Hawaii to cut koa trees on government-owned lands. Because of this, koa is hard to come across, and very expensive. But, Jones explains, “On private land, people can grow and harvest koa.”

The problem is that it’s not the easiest tree to grow commercially. It’s susceptible to fungus, so HARC has been working with generations of koa trees to try to determine which koa family lines are more naturally resistant to fungal growth.

HARC has also worked to see if it could be beneficial to intersperse koa trees with other crops, such as cacao and coffee. The result is a small batch of chocolate, and a larger crop of coffee that is being sold as Maunawili Farms Coffee.

“This is our first commercial crop this year,” says Jones. Previously, the coffee was just to show proof of concept. Additionally, the farm at Maunawili holds trainings and workshops to show local farmers its process.

HARC also aims to assist local agriculture through affordable housing. “One of our focuses has been preserving agricultural housing in Kunia. It’s the last remaining plantation village in Hawaii,” according to Jones.

The housing project is a way both to preserve some of Hawaii’s plantation history, and to help with current housing shortages.

Even though HARC is currently selling coffee and a small amount of honey when available, as a nonprofit, making money through coffee or honey production isn’t the goal. The goal is to do research and development that will perpetuate agriculture in Hawaii’s future, even as land costs and the cost of living increases.

“Ultimately the purpose of this is not to grow and sell coffee,” says Jones. “We use it as a demonstration space for farmers.”

For more information about HARC and where to purchase Maunawili Farms Coffee, visit www.harc-hspa.com

MY DOG HAS FLEAS: UKELELE IN HAWAII, PAST AND PRESENT

ARTICLE by Julie Yaste

ukulele

The ukulele is simple: four strings, a dozen or so frets and a gently curved wooden frame.

Within an afternoon, a novice player can pick up a song or two. There’s something beautiful in its minimalism. Songs can be as simple or complex as the player desires. No matter the song or technique, whenever a tune is strummed on a ukulele, Hawaii comes to mind.

For over a century, the ukulele has been the emblem of Hawaiian mele, or songs. Few places are so closely associated with a single instrument as Hawaii is with the ukulele. And like so many of the icons of Hawaiiana, the ukulele didn’t originate on these sandy shores. Instead it was transplanted during the plantation boom.

Sugar plantations that were tended by close-knit communities of immigrants fueled Hawaii’s economy for decades. The plantations started bringing over laborers in the mid-1800s from China, Japan, Korea, the Philippines and eventually from Portugal and Puerto Rico. Each influx of people brought their own cultural traditions, from food to language and especially music.

In 1879 a boat laden with workers from the Portuguese island of Madeira pulled into Honolulu Harbor, and some of these newcomers brought small four-stringed guitars called machetes. These instruments evolved in Hawaii, taking on four standard sizes and tuning, eventually settling into a modern ukulele. By the turn of the 20th century they had solidified as one of the most popular instruments in Hawaii.

There is no consensus on how it went from machete to ukulele or what precisely “ukulele” translates to. The most common translation is “jumping flea,” because of how musicians’ fingers seemed to jump around while playing. That’s probably why the song people sing to tune is “My Dog Has Fleas” for each note: G-C-E-A.

Ukuleles made their way to the international stage during the 1920’s, when jazz musicians made heavy use of them. Their popularity waned somewhat for the next few decades, but hits like Tiny Tim’s 1968 “Tiptoe Through the Tulips” kept ukuleles in the popular consciousness throughout the years.

Now ukuleles are popular all over the world, thanks in part to the hit success of Israel Kamakawiwo‘ole’s rendition of “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” and virtuosos like Jake Shimabukuro. There are many small craftsmen who build stunning instruments throughout the Islands, but four companies have risen to the height of the industry in Hawaii: Kamaka, Kanile‘a, KoAloha and Ko‘olau. They’re affectionately known as the four K’s. Instruments by these master builders are guaranteed to have a stellar sound, and many professional local musicians prefer instruments from one of these companies.

Kanile‘a employee at his workstation
Kanile‘a employee at his workstation

 

So while you enjoy a perfect dinner in Waikiki with resident musicians serenading you on the ukulele, take a look at the instruments. Chances are, that “uke” came from one of these four companies.

KAMAKA UKULELE

Kamaka is the oldest ukulele manufacturer in Hawaii. It’s been family owned and operated since 1916. The company started when Sam Kamaka Sr. started making koa wood ukuleles out of the basement in his Kaimuki home, and it grew from there. By the 1930s he enlisted his two young sons, Sam Jr. and Fred, to help in the shop, even though they were both still in elementary school. Now, at 92, Fred Kamaka still helps with factory tours four days a week, where he regales visitors with stories from his youth and how the company came to be.

Fred tells how his father gained a reputation for creating quality handcrafted instruments. During the ukulele craze of the 1920s Sam Sr. experimented with body shape, and engineered the first “pineapple” ukulele. That original pineapple ukulele—painted to look like a pineapple—is on display inside the shop.

Pineapple ukulele under construction at Kamaka
Pineapple ukulele under construction at Kamaka

 

After Sam Kamaka Sr. died in 1953, Sam Jr. and Fred took over the business and honed the skills they had started to learn as children, making ukuleles by hand. Now their sons run the business.

With the new generation have come new innovations. While much of the assembly is still done by hand, some of it is now automated. The necks and front and back panels are all cut by machine then put together. Chris Kamaka, Sam Sr.’s grandson, checks each instrument before it is shipped out.

2017 marks the 101st year in business for Kamaka Ukulele and it’s going strong. “What happens the second hundred years?” Fred will ask visitors. “I don’t know. I won’t be around.” But it’s clear that he’s not worried. The business is in good hands.

Tours are offered Tuesday through Friday at 10:30 a.m.

KANILE’A UKULELE

Kanile‘a Ukulele was founded by Hawaii-born couple Kristen and Joe Souza in 1998 in the hope of producing heirloom quality instruments.

The majority of the ukes that come out of Kanile‘a are made from koa wood that was largely harvested on the Big Island.  In addition to koa instruments, Kanile‘a uses walnut and a few other wood types, often by request in custom orders.

Ukulele sides in different molds at Ko‘olau
Ukulele sides in different molds at Ko‘olau

 

Kanile‘a blends traditional by-hand construction methods with some newer mechanized steps. The necks are cut by machine and a special laser cutter generates the pearl inlays. Everything else is done by hand. The resulting instrument is quality checked before being sold. Any instrument that doesn’t pass muster is sent back to the factory and not made available for sale.

In addition to handcrafted instruments, Kanile‘a also has a more affordable line of instruments called Islander Ukuleles. These ukes are shipped in from overseas and while less individualized, they are still good instruments that are great for a new player.

Owners Joe and Kristen also have a vested interest in conservation, and run a nonprofit geared towards protecting and enhancing koa wood forests. Their nonprofit is called Reforest Hawaii.

Tours are available daily at 10:30 a.m.

KOALOHA

Unlike Kamaka and Kanile‘a, all aspects of forming the body of the ukulele at KoAloha are done without machinery. “Everything is cut and glued by hand,” says employee and tour guide Daniel Nakashima. It’s clear that Nakashima, as well as all employees, takes great pride in the work.

The instruments here utilize an interesting internal bracing system. Instead of traditional bracing along the interior of the ukulele and by the sound hole, KoAloha has a unibrace that gives it increased stability. They are so stable that, during a factory tour, Nakashima will place the body of a ukulele on the floor and stand on it. It’s a cringe-worthy sight, as most instruments would buckle under the weight of an adult male, but the KoAloha uke holds.

Nakashima shows two unfinished ukuleles at KoAloha
Nakashima shows two unfinished ukuleles at KoAloha

 

The company uses a wide variety of wood including koa, monkeypod, rosewood and mahogany. The different types of wood all produce their own sound. The only items not made in-house is the instrument’s necks, which is laser cut overseas then glued onto the body.

Tours are available Monday through Friday at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m.

KO’OLAU GUITAR & UKULELE

Ko‘olau Guitar & Ukulele is a custom shop, with no standard models. Patrons will pick and choose the shape, size, type of wood and design based on personal preference to produce something customized to the player.

This is another family-run business with a father and son, Jon and Noa Kitakis. Noa crafts the instruments. Because it is a custom shop, Noa has the freedom to tailor every detail for optimum sound. That careful attention comes at a price. Ukuleles from Ko‘olau routinely sell for $2,000 or more.

Part of that cost is the intricate inlays Ko‘olau is known for. Just about any design you can imagine can be made into an inlay including tropical flowers, green sea turtles and taro leaves.

The other three ukulele shops make custom orders upon request, but that isn’t the primary business.

You might think that with a tight market for high-end ukuleles these companies might have a strong rivalry, but that isn’t the case.

“We’re all friends,” Noa says.

Recipes

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AZURE LOBSTER “ROLL” WITH MEYER LEMON PRESERVE AND TOBIKO

lobster-roll2 lobster tails (4 ounces peeled)
4 Tablespoons aioli
1 teaspoon finely chopped truffle
1/2 teaspoon truffle oil
12 each Meyer lemon
6 ounces sugar
3 Tablespoons kosher salt
1 teaspoon turmeric
1 ounce browned butter
1 ounce red tobiko
1 loaf brioche
1 cup clarified butter
Tarragon to taste

PROCEDURE:
Skewer lobster tails and blanch in Court bouillon. Pull out right before it is fully cooked, letting heat carry over. Do not ice. Once chilled, slice into fourths. Add truffles and oil to aioli. Peel lemon leaving only zest with no pith. Blanch zest. Juice lemon and save. Put salt, sugar, juice, turmeric and zest together and bring to a simmer. Cook until soft. Blend until puree is smooth. Add water if needed. Freeze brioche. Cut brioche into 3-inch-long-by-1 1/4-inch-wide and 1/2-inch-tall slices. On slicer, cut bread on a 13-15 setting. Cut out 1-inch-diameter circles. Fry circles in the clarified butter until golden brown. Season as they come out. Toast rectangle of bread with seasoned whole butter. Brown butter and add tarragon and chervil. Strain.

ASSEMBLY:
Pull a large bead of aioli on top of the plate and a pool for the bread to sit on. Pull a large bead of lemon preserve on bottom right. Place bread on aioli, lobster on top of that with aioli in between slices. Single toasted brioche in lobster. With warm butter, add tobiko and drizzle over lobster. Garnish with chervil.

 

ROY’S HAMACHI APPETIZER

hamachi-appetixzer
INGREDIENTS:
4 ounces fresh sushi-grade hamachi
1/2 cup lemon-juice concentrate
1/2 cup soy sauce
1 medium chopped onion
2 Tablespoons minced garlic
2 Thai chilis
1/4 cup olive oil

DIRECTIONS:
Over medium heat, cook onion, garlic and Thai chilis, then add liquids. Let sauce cool. Carefully slice hamachi to roughly bite-size pieces. Gently mix with other prepared ingredients. Garnish with edible flowers and green

 

BILL’S PERFECT SCRAMBLED EGGS

bills-scrambledINGREDIENTS:
2 eggs
1 ounce heavy cream
1 Pinch sea salt
1 Tablespoon butter

DIRECTIONS:
Whip eggs and cream in a bowl. Heat butter in a nonstick pan. Once the butter is melted, add salt. When the salt starts to crackle in the pan, add the egg mixture. Let the egg mixture settle in the pan. As soon as it starts to harden, take a spatula and ring it around the edges of the pan until the eggs are fully cooked (approximately 5 minutes). The eggs will appear slightly runny in the pan.

 

ROYAL HAWAIIAN PINK HAUPIA CAKE

HAUPIA

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease two 8-inch baking pans.

CAKE
8 ounces cake flour
6 ounces granulated sugar
3/4 Tablespoons baking powder
Sift the cake flour, granulated sugar and baking powder together and set aside
4 ounces vegetable oil
4 ounces egg yolks
5 1/2 ounce water
8 ounces egg whites
4 ounces granulated sugar

DIRECTIONS:
Whisk oil, egg yolks and water in a bowl and gradually add dry ingredients while whisking. Mix till a smooth batter is created. Whip egg whites until foamy and gradually sprinkle in the sugar. Whip until mixture forms stiff peaks. Gently fold cake batter into egg whites. Pour into pans and bake at 350 degrees 30–40 minutes. Cool on rack.

HAUPIA FILLING
1 (12-ounce) can coconut milk
4-6 Tablespoons sugar
6 Tablespoons cornstarch dissolved in 3/4 cup water
3-4 drops red or pink food coloring

DIRECTIONS:
Bring coconut milk and sugar to a boil. Make a slurry with the cornstarch and water, whisk into boiling mixture. Add a few drops of pink color and continue mixing on heat for 3-5 minutes, until thick. Pour into container and cool completely.

TOPPING
1 quart heavy whipping cream
6 ounces sugar
Pink food coloring
Sweetened coconut flakes

DIRECTIONS:
Whip cream with sugar till medium peaks, then add pink to create a pastel color. Set aside. Mix coconut flakes with pink until desired color is reached. Set aside.

ASSEMBLY
Cut the 8-inch rounds in two equal layers for a total of four layers. Put the set haupia in a stand mixer and mix until creamed. Alternate layers of cake and haupia. Ice the cake with the pink whipped cream and coat sides with pink coconut flakes.

Fermenting a Revolution

fermenting-a-revolutionAs a Sonoma County, California, native, I am no stranger to fermentation.  My dad used to make his own wine and beer in the garage of our home. Weekends often included jaunts to favorite wineries where my sister Sarah and I could play in the gardens. Only once did we mortify our parents by throwing rocks in a fishpond (I still contend Sarah started it).

Wine and the fermentation process were everywhere, driving our local economy. I assumed all 8-year-olds could cite the difference between a Zinfandel and Petite Syrah. It seemed totally normal.

While I was a child in Northern California, a place synonymous with wine production, George Killmer was half a world away in Japan and Korea, the latter locale having its own ubiquitous fermented fare: kimchi.

cutting-cabbage
Killmer cutting fresh Napa cabbage.

Kimchi is largely considered the national food of Korea. It takes many forms, but most commonly it’s a spicy fermented cabbage, traditionally served with white rice.

Killmer grew up with kimchi. He’s gone through phases when he didn’t eat it much, but now he devours it regularly. “If you don’t have kimchi,” Killmer says, “you’re having a bad day.”

Killmer is “hapa haole,” a colloquial term for someone who is part Caucasian and part another ethnicity. His mother is Korean, and his dad is a Caucasian former U.S. government contractor. Growing up, kimchi was everywhere. As a kid he even ate the spicy cabbage his mother made in oatmeal for breakfast. Her recipe for kimchi is the foundation for Jincha Kimchi, the small business he runs with his partner, Jamie-Lynn Gomes. Gomes did not have regular access to kimchi in her youth. She is part Hawaiian and graduated from Kamehameha Schools. She recalls how her mother’s Korean friend would gift a jar of kimchi once or twice a year. It was a treat, not a given. This aromatic side dish had yet to develop a place in larger restaurants or markets in the Islands.

Ready access, however, can have some drawbacks, which Killmer knew well. “When I was growing up, it was embarrassing,” he says. “It was always like, Don’t let people see the kimchi.” It was a source of shame to have something so different in his home. By this point, his family had moved stateside after time spent in Japan and Korea. Living in the Pacific Northwest as a teen, Killmer wanted to fit in. Kimchi was “stinky cabbage” that looked, tasted and smelled weird to his friends.

Then something interesting happened. Killmer became a chef who worked in the Mid-Atlantic region. He started seeing kimchi outside of Korean markets and restaurants. Suddenly it was gaining mainstream popularity with eateries for a simple reason: People liked it.

Killmer pours ground red chili peppers in a mixture of garlic, fish sauce and a secret ingredient to form a paste.
Killmer pours ground red chili peppers in a mixture of garlic, fish sauce and a secret ingredient to form a paste.

With this surge in popularity, Killmer returned to his childhood staple. It no longer held a stigma as a smelly cabbage. Killmer moved to Hawaii 10 years ago, where he met Gomes. They started Jincha Kimchi in June 2015.

Their process begins with only local, fresh produce, including Napa cabbage, ginger and garlic. “It’s the quality of our ingredients that makes our kimchi so good,” says Gomes.

Gomes carefully massages the chili paste into brined cabbage.
Gomes carefully massages the chili paste into brined cabbage.

It’s more than the ingredients, though. There is tremendous care in how they make each batch. It can take up to nine hours to make. Killmer says it’s something “deep in my soul,” that drives him to keep making and selling kimchi. The pair makes roughly 100 pounds of the fermented and pungent cabbage every two weeks from their 500-square-foot kitchen.

With ingredients in hand, Killmer and Gomes start making kimchi by carefully washing then cutting the cabbage. It then soaks in a saltwater brine for two to five hours, by far the most time intensive step of the process.

Fresh sprigs of herbs are added after the cabbage and chili paste are fully integrated.
Fresh sprigs of herbs are added after the cabbage and chili paste are fully integrated.

Killmer starts by cutting the cabbage to soak while Gomes preps a fish sauce. The sauce is made with kelp, green onions and dried anchovies that Killmer’s mother brings with her from Korea. It’s a fragrant mix.

With fresh fish sauce in hand, Gomes and Killmer begin prepping the kimchi paste with which they will slather the cabbage. Each ingredient is carefully cleaned and measured. The paste is made of garlic, ginger, herbs, fermented baby shrimp, fish sauce and, of course, dried spicy red chili peppers.

Today, most kimchi is spicy and colored bright red from chili peppers. This wasn’t always the case. Chili peppers aren’t native to Korea. It wasn’t until trade was established with the Americas in the 1500s that chili peppers became available to the world, eventually changing the nature of kimchi to its current spicy state. Traditionally, it was made seasonally based on whichever vegetables were available. It was not what modern eaters think of as kimchi.

Above, Gomes and illmer pose outside their Kalihi kitchen space.
Above, Gomes and illmer pose outside their Kalihi kitchen space.

Killmer and Gomes definitely make a modern kimchi, though they label the flavor as “local kine,” meaning it’s suited to the tastes of Hawaii residents. Kimchi in Korea tends to have a much stronger flavor, with more spice in the paste. The paste they make is spicy and savory, but not overwhelming.

Once they have the perfect paste, Killmer will check the cabbage to see if it has soaked long enough. The cabbage gets rinsed several times to remove excess salt, and then it’s massaged into the paste until evenly mixed.

At this point it’s edible, but it hasn’t had a chance to ferment yet. Fermentation takes at least two weeks, which is the minimum time they age each batch before sale. It’s left bottled in reusable mason jars in their fridge until ready.

It never tastes the same twice. Like wine, different vintages of kimchi are nuanced. They’ve taken as many controls as possible in refining the recipe, but fermentation can fluctuate, producing variations in each batch. It’s interesting to taste the changes, or even note the development in kimchi as it continues to ferment after purchase.

Kimchi in general is fermented via lactic acid bacteria, which kills off any other bacteria that would normally lead vegetables to rot. This process leaves kimchi with probiotic properties, meaning that kimchi is actually incredibly good for you. It’s also high in vitamins and may prevent certain cancers. Gomes mentions one frequent buyer who says the kimchi helps ease her rheumatoid arthritis.

This is just one process for one kind of kimchi. Jincha makes several varietals, but this is its staple, and what most people think of as kimchi. It’s a big world where kimchi is concerned, and anyone can make it.

As Killmer says, “there’s really no wrong or right way. It just comes down to if you like it or not.”

Jincha Kimchi is available at the Windward Mall farmers’ market. Visit its website for more information at www.jinchakimchi.com.

Forkless Fare

forkless

Giovanni Pastrami

MINI PASTRAMI SLIDERS:The pastrami reuben sandwich is definitely king at Giovanni Pastrami. In fact, the restaurant went through 10,000 pounds of premium pastrami last year specifically because of how popular this delectable, half-pound sandwich is. For some though, a half-pound of pastrami is a little daunting. Fear not! The great chefs behind the reuben have miniaturized it with four bite-size sliders that have all the flavor of the full sandwich.

Round Table Pizza

KING ARTHUR SUPREME AND GOURMET VEGGIE: There are few other foods that are as versatile and universally loved as pizza. There are options for any palate and Round Table Pizza in Waikiki treats pizza like royalty with the King Arthur supreme. This pie has just about everything, including classic red sauce, three cheeses, pepperoni, Italian sausage, salami, Portuguese sausage, mushrooms, green peppers, white onions and black olives. For non-meat lovers, try the gourmet veggie. The veggie pizza has all of the fresh vegetables you know you should eat but probably don’t unless their healthy attributes are cleverly disguised in a pizza.

Beachhouse at the Moana

AFTERNOON TEA ON THE VERANDA: Tea parties aren’t solely the purview of young girls in tiaras. Adults can certainly have tea parties too. Just head to the Moana Surfrider Hotel on any given afternoon for a full tea service at Beachhouse. The fi rst- lady tea service (pictured)  includes your choice of tea, sparkling rosé, fresh berries with crème fraiche and brown sugar, miniature sandwiches and stunning pastries.

Tommy Bahama

AHI TUNA TACOS: These tacos are Mexican fare with an Asian twist. Crisp wonton shells replace a traditional tortilla in Tommy Bahama’s tuna tacos. Tacos come with rare tuna, Island slaw and a wasabi-avocado pur´ee. They’re a perfect snack when you’re feeling peckish, or a delicious start to any meal.

Rum Fire

TATAS: Tater tots may make you think of elementary school lunch ladies in mesh caps, but they’ve certainly grown to a gourmet affair beyond a typical lunch lady’s abilities with Rumfi re’s tatas. These spuds are drizzled in truffl e oil then tossed with parmesan and sea salt. Eating just one isn’t an option. You’ll want to fi nish the whole basket.

Sansei Seafood Restaurant & Sushi Barum Fire

DRAGONFLY ROLL: Usually eaten with chopsticks, the dragonfly roll is a distinctly forkless bit of Japanese cuisine. This classic roll features spicy tuna and cucumber inside and Hawaiian ahi tuna, avocado, masago and sweet Thai chili aioli on top. Sansei features only top-quality ingredients in its award-winning sushi.